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Dodgers announce selections from 2013 First-Year Player Draft

LOS ANGELES - The Los Angeles Dodgers today announced their final 30 selections from the 2013 First-Year Player Draft after making their first 10 selections on Thursday and Friday.

Overall, the Dodgers selected 21 pitchers (14 right-handers, seven left-handers), nine infielders, six catchers and four outfielders. The club used 31 picks on college players and selected nine high school prospects.

Los Angeles drafted several players with big league bloodlines. In the 12th round, the Dodgers selected Brigham Young University third baseman Adam Law, whose grandfather Vern won the 1960 Cy Young Award with the Pittsburgh Pirates. As a junior team captain in 2013, Law led the Cougars in hits (76), stolen bases (14), batting average (.365) and on-base percentage (.440) and was honored with All-West Coast Conference First Team honors in addition to an Academic All-WCC selection. In the 17th round, Los Angeles selected right-handed pitcher Greg Harris out of Los Alamitos High School, son of 15-year MLB veteran right-hander Greg Harris. With their 20th round selection, Los Angeles picked outfielder Michael Ahmed, brother of Arizona Diamondbacks infield prospect Nick. The Dodgers also selected University of the Pacific outfielder Tyger Pederson in the 33rd round, brother of Double-A Chattanooga outfielder Joc and son of former Dodger outfielder Stu.

The Dodgers also selected two sons of club scouts: Arlington Country Day School (FL) shortstop Blake Hennessey (19th round), son of Scott, and Olympia (FL) High School catcher Jake Sidwell (39th round), son of Rob. In the 31st round, the Dodgers selected Andrew McWilliam, whose father, Tim, is a Detroit Tigers scout.

Among the 31 college players selected, catcher Spencer Navin's (11th round selection) Vanderbilt Commodores, right-handed pitcher Peter Miller's (16th round selection) Florida State Seminoles and left-handed pitcher Robert Fisher's (22nd round selection) Oklahoma Sooners are still alive among the 16 schools remaining in the NCAA Men's Baseball tournament.

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