Dodgers motion against claims in Stow case

Dodgers motion against claims in Stow case

Dodgers motion against claims in Stow case
LOS ANGELES -- The Dodgers filed a motion with the bankruptcy court on Friday to disallow all claims by Bryan Stow and his children stemming from Stow's beating in the Dodger Stadium parking lot on Opening Day last year.

Stow, a 42-year-old Giants fan from Santa Cruz, suffered critical head injuries in a parking lot assault after the Dodgers played the Giants on March 31, 2011.

The Los Angeles Police Department arrested Marvin Norwood and Louis Sanchez in connection with the beating and they are in custody awaiting trial.

A suit was filed on behalf of Stow and his two children against the Dodgers, owner Frank McCourt and more than a dozen defendants and then a claim was filed with the Delaware court overseeing the Dodgers bankruptcy. Stow claimed the defendants were negligent and liable as owners of the property.

In their filing, the Dodgers contend that Stow and his family cannot prevail in court on their claims as a matter of law.

The Dodgers argued that Stow cannot prove any link between additional security steps he contended should have been taken and his injuries or that the security staffing that day caused his injuries; also, the club argued it had no knowledge of inappropriate conduct by Stow's assailants prior to the attack and can't be held liable for failure to anticipate a criminal act.

Stow also argued that the Dodgers should have escorted him to a taxi stand and that his injuries were caused by the presence of known criminals or gang members. The Dodgers responded by saying Stow never asked for an escort and there is no evidence that the assailants are known criminals or gang members.

The Dodgers also contested the claim that inadequate lighting "caused" the attack and asked the court to rule that they should not be liable for punitive damages as sought by Stow.

A hearing will be held March 7.

Ken Gurnick is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.